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Andrew Pollock


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Monday, 08 December 2014

A geek Dad goes to Kindergarten with a box full of Open Source and some vegetables

Zoe's Kindergarten encourages parents to come in and spend some time with the kids. I've heard reports of other parents coming in and doing baking with the kids or other activities at various times throughout the year.

Zoe and I had both wanted me to come in for something, but it had taken me until the last few weeks of the year to get my act together and do something.

I'd thought about coming in and doing some baking, but that seemed rather done to death already, and it's not like baking is really my thing, so I thought I'd do something technological. I just wracked my brains for something low effort and Kindergarten-age friendly.

The Kindergarten has a couple of eduss touch screens. They're just some sort of large-screen with a bunch of inputs and outputs on them. I think the Kindergarten mostly uses them for showing DVDs and hooking up a laptop and possibly doing something interactive on them.

As they had HDMI input, and my Raspberry Pi had HDMI output, it seemed like a no-brainer to do something using the Raspberry Pi. I also thought hooking up the MaKey MaKey to it would make for a more fun experience. I just needed to actually have it all do something, and that's where I hit a bit of a creative brick wall.

I thought I'd just hack something together where based on different inputs on the MaKey MaKey, a picture would get displayed and a sound played. Nothing fancy at all. I really struggled to get a picture displayed full screen in a time efficient manner. My Pi was running Raspbian, so it was relatively simple to configure LightDM to auto-login and auto-start something. I used triggerhappy to invoke a shell script, which took care of playing a sound and an image.

Playing a sound was easy. Displaying an image less so, especially if I wanted the image loaded fast. I really wanted to avoid having to execute an image viewer every time an input fired, because that would be just way too slow. I thought I'd found a suitable application in Geeqie, because it supported being out of band managed, but it's problem was it also responded to the inputs from the MaKey MaKey, so it became impossible to predictably display the right image with the right input.

So the night before I was supposed to go to Kindergarten, I was up beating my head against it, and decided to scrap it and go back to the drawing board. I was looking around for a Kindergarten-friendly game that used just the arrow keys, and I remembered the trusty old Frozen Bubble.

This ended up being absolutely perfect. It had enough flags to control automatic startup, so I could kick it straight into a dumbed-down full screen 1 player game (--fullscreen --solo --no-time-limit)

The kids absolutely loved it. They were cycled through in groups of four and all took turns having a little play. I brought a couple of heads of broccoli, a zucchini and a potato with me. I started out using the two broccoli as left and right and the zucchini to fire, but as it turns out, not all the kids were as good with the "left" and "right" as Zoe, so I swapped one of the broccoli for a potato and that made things a bit less ambiguous.

The responses from the kids were varied. Quite a few clearly had their minds blown and wanted to know how the broccoli was controlling something on the screen. Not all of them got the hang of the game play, but a lot did. Some picked it up after having a play and then watching other kids play and then came back for a more successful second attempt. Some weren't even sure what a zucchini was.

Overall, it was a very successful activity, and I'm glad I switched to Frozen Bubble, because what I'd originally had wouldn't have held up to the way the kids were using it. There was a lot of long holding/touching of the vegetables, which would have fired hundreds of repeat events, and just totally overwhelmed triggerhappy. Quite a few kids wanted to pick up and hold the vegetables instead of just touch them to send an event. As it was, the Pi struggled to play Frozen Bubble enough as it was.

The other lesson I learned pretty quickly was that an aluminium BBQ tray worked a lot better as the grounding point for the MaKey MaKey than having to tether an anti-static strap around each kid's ankle as they sat down in front of the screen. Once I switched to the tray, I could rotate kids through the activity much faster.

I just wish I was a bit more creative, or there were more Kindergarten-friendly arrow-key driven Linux applications out there, but I was happy with what I managed to hack together with a fairly minimal amount of effort.

[17:04] [tech] [permalink]

Day 313: Kindergarten, errands and podiatrist

I had a pretty busy morning. Zoe woke up around 12:45am complaining about a sore foot or something. I never quite got to the bottom of it, but I resettled her and got her back to sleep.

She then woke up at 6am for the day, and we managed to breeze through the morning super easily (for a change), with enough time for me to put laundry away and pump up the bike tyres and still arrive at Kindergarten right on opening time. It was all rather amazing.

The Kindergarten director asked me if I happened to have 40 CD sleeves "because I was a computer person", so I offered to go pick some up for her.

I biked back home, and fixed up one of my real estate licence course units that I had to resubmit due to a couple of mistakes, and then headed out in the car.

I debated going to OfficeWorks, which would have resulted in more back and forth, or trying K Mart at Cannon Hill. I ended up going for K Mart, and they didn't have any. Neither did Dick Smith or the post office. I got lucky at one of the cheap shops, and managed to get a pack of 100. I did manage to pick up some cheap plain t-shirts for Zoe to wear under her sun dresses to protect her shoulders, so it wasn't a completely wasted trip.

I dropped the sleeves back into the Kindergarten, and then mailed off the corrected coursework and headed back home.

There was another storm looming at around pick up time, so I drove back to Kindergarten. They've already started end of year clean up stuff, and they've taken down all the stuff from this year from the walls, and the Kindergarten looks shocking stark now.

My health insurance covers podiatry, so I figured I might as well get Zoe checked out before we buy school shoes. I'd made an appointment for 3pm at the myFootDr headquarters over in Camp Hill, where my neighbour Meg happens to work.

Zoe was initially not keen on going, but once we got there, she was fine. They were running a bit behind, so we watched some TV in the waiting room. After watching Wild Vets, Zoe's decided she doesn't want to be a vet any more.

We had a really nice podiatrist, and Zoe was very comfortable with her, and happy to go through the examination. The podiatrist was very impressed with Zoe's physical abilities and general balance, and said she was well ahead of her milestones, which was pretty impressive. I chalk that up to all of the varied physical activities she's done this year.

She said normally she wouldn't try and put a 4 and a half year old on the treadmill for video gait analysis, but given how good Zoe had been, she gave it a shot. Zoe did fine.

I'm really glad that I took her to the podiatrist, because I got some good general advice about what to expect with Zoe's growth given her body shape, and we bought a more appropriate shoe type for her foot than I'd have otherwise bought at the uniform shop. I also got a pair of running shoes for her as well. Zoe had heaps of fun to boot.

The storm hit while we were there, but fortunately there was no hail in it. It had mostly receded by the time we left. We popped in to the post office on the way home, and then the weather turned a bit foul again, and we timed it just right to pick up Anshu from the ferry terminal on the way home.

Sarah arrived not long after that to pick Zoe up.

[16:35] [life] [permalink]